Critical writing and reading

Study guide For a printer-friendly PDF version of this guide, click here Critical reading is an important precursor to critical writing. This Study Guide explains why critical reading is important, and gives some ideas about how you might become a more critical reader.

Critical writing and reading

In fact, if you combine this one tip with my Sentence Completion methodyour Critical Reading score will go up by 50 to points. Sometimes when you read a passage, you may get confused by certain words, sentences, or even whole paragraphs.

You might be tempted to re-read those parts until you understand exactly what they mean. Which details do you have to know? The SAT will tell you. Any question that asks about specific details from the passage will refer you back to specific lines. When that happens, you do need to go back and re-read lines, and usually a little bit before and after as well.

First we have to look at our second tip. You have to look for the best possible answer among the choices they give you. Sometimes none of them seem right to me, either. Sometimes none of the answers will be the same as how you would answer if you could write anything you want.

One of the answers will still be better than all the rest. All of the wrong answers have something about them that make them wrong. Students who do really well on this section know this.

critical writing and reading

They use the process of elimination to eliminate the answers that are clearly wrong, then pick the best remaining answer. The main idea of that passage, and the authors opinion, can be simply stated as: In fact, going all the way back to Plato, the primary means of artistic expression have always been attacked like TV is today.

I think that people who do that are wrong. If you know that the author himself is not criticizing TV, you know that A is wrong, and the answer is C. This question is easy.

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The least bad television show is D, which is the correct answer. This type of question is asking you about what a word means in the context of the passage. Plato thought those stories, and their heroes, were bad, in the same way some people today think that TV is bad, so you know that A and B are wrong.

Since Plato felt very strongly about that, the answer is E. This question is about the same lines you read for the previous question. The author is building up his argument that Plato was wrong, so the answer is A. Remembering the main idea, the correct answer is D.

The author disagrees with Plato, so A, C, and D are wrong. Plato was a Greek philosopher, so E is wrong. The correct answer is B.Find great deals on eBay for critical thinking reading and writing ashio-midori.com Your Cart With Color · Top Brands · Under $10 · Huge SavingsCategories: Books, Textbooks & Educational Books, Nonfiction Books and more.

Critical reading is an analytic activity. The reader re reads a text to identify patterns of elements -- information, values, assumptions, and language usage-- throughout the discussion.

These elements are tied together in an interpretation, an assertion of an underlying meaning of the text as a whole. Critical thinking, reading, and writing are among the most important skills necessary for succeeding in high school and college. Teachers will assume that their . Critical writing depends on critical reading.

Most of the papers you write will involve reflection on written texts – the thinking and research that has already been done on your subject. Critical reading is an important precursor to critical writing. This Study Guide explains why critical reading is important, and gives some ideas about how you might become a more critical reader.

Critical reading is a highly reflective skill requiring you to “stand back” and get some distance from the text you are reading (even a close reading, getting as close to the text as possible, is a “standing back” as you separate the passage from the rest of the text).

Dan Kurland's ashio-midori.com -- Strategies for Critical Reading and Writing